Alumni Publishes Paper

We had the pleasure of hearing from Matthew Pincus, now a PhD candidate at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He writes:

“It feels like it has been so long since Naropa even though it has only been a couple years. This Spring I was able to publish an article on Leslie Marmon Silko titled “Bewitched Policies of Resistance: America’s Legacy of Unknown Soldiers in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Storyteller” in a peer-reviewed journal called Transmodernity. It was a special issue of the journal that focused on Indigenous Knowledges and Indigenous Sites of Memory. The journal is open-access, and I was among other international scholars presenting on research about Indigenous cultures from South, Central and North America. It was incredible to have my work featured in this journal, and certainly the work I did at Naropa started this research and encouraged me to continue my work at UL-Lafayette.”

Congratulations on the publication Matthew!

Here’s the abstract:

Abstract Storyteller (1981) by Leslie Marmon Silko is a unique hybridized text of Laguna Myths centered on topics of Laguna Pueblo Citizens, and more generally Indigenous Southwestern Americans. “Tony’s Story,” “Uncle Tony’s Goat,” and “A Geronimo Story” are three tales where characters are agents of political resistance against injustices enacted by the American Military and law enforcement over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Each story subverts the dominant “white” narrative of American politics and history through use of traditional Laguna Pueblo values linked to the inseparable geographical terrain they call home. In “Tony’s Story,” the protagonist and his friend enact a revenge narrative on a racist cop who abuses his power, thus commenting on modern-day police brutality. A cop is killed, and rain at the end of the story acts as an emergent symbol of freedom creating an age of peace against the violence that has patrolled its borders. “Uncle Tony’s Goat,” about a billy goat who refuses to be penned in, acts as a metaphorical bridge to “A Geronimo Story,” where historical Apache chief, Geronimo, also a mythical folk legend in American culture, escapes and evades the American military. Geronimo was originally captured and imprisoned by American colonial militaristic forces, but in Silko’s reimagining he is an elusive figure only known to the cavalry by name. In these stories, characters become free to interact and commune with the land, and sites of invasion and theft from the indigenous become sites of reverence and remembrance.

Click here for the full article!