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In-Person w/ Basma Alsharif: Alternative Cinema

Monday, February 27 at 7 PM – 9:30 PM

After History / Post Palestine
A selection of short films by Artist/Filmmaker Basma Alsharif that explore Palestine’s political history through visceral landscapes reflecting on the human condition and the future beyond history.
Total Program = approximately 80 minutes
[please see event discussion for individual synopses]
http://www.internationalfilmseries.com/first_person_cinema/

Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics and the University of Colorado Film Studies Program were honored to host Basma Alsharif for the In-Person: Alternative Cinema event on Monday, February 27, 2017 on the Naropa University Arapahoe Campus in the Performing Art Center, 2130 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder, CO at 7:00 p.m.

Basma Alsharif is an Artist/Filmmaker born in Kuwait to Palestinian parents, raised between France and the US. Since receiving a Master of Fine Arts in 2007 from the University of Illinois at Chicago, she developed her practice nomadically between Chicago, Cairo, Beirut, Sharjah, Amman, the Gaza Strip and Paris.

Basma Alsharif’s work centers on the human condition in relation to shifting geopolitical landscapes and natural environments. Interested in what cannot ever be proven or explained, she uses photography, film, video, sound, language and performance to reveal the fallibility of our perception and of history. Engaging with politics on a visceral level through pieces characterized by their immersive, lyrical qualities, Alsharif creates familiar environments that lure us into unsettling experiences of being comfortable and foreign simultaneously.

Major exhibitions include: Le Prix Découverte des Rencontres d’Arles, les Module at the Palais de Tokyo, Here and Elsewhere at the New Museum, the Jerusalem Show, Yamagata Documentary Film Festival, the Berlinale, the Sharjah Biennial, Videobrasil, and Manifesta 8. She received a jury prize at the Sharjah Biennial 9, the Marion MacMahon award at Images, and was awarded the Marcelino Botin Visual Arts grant. Basma Alsharif is represented by Galerie Imane Farés in Paris, distributed by Video Data Bank and Arsenal, and is now based in Los Angeles.

 

We Began by Measuring Distance (2009) SD Video ~ 19 minutes. Long still frames, text, language, and sound are weaved together to unfold the narrative of ananonymous group who fill their time by measuring distance. Innocent measurements transition into political ones, examining how image and sound communicate history. We Began by Measuring Distance explores an ultimate disenchantment with facts when the visual fails to communicate the tragic.

A Field Guide to the Ferns (2015) 16mm HD transfer ~ 10 minutes. “Primitive savagery meets the brutality of the modern world in Ruggero Deodato’s timeless slice of visceral horror”. Cannibal Holocaust is revived deep in the New Hampshire woods
where apathy and violence are blurred.

This image requires alt text, but the alt text is currently blank. Either add alt text or mark the image as decorative.Home Movies Gaza (2013) HD video ~ 24 minutes
Home Movies Gaza introduces us to the Gaza Strip as a microcosm for the failure of civilization. In an attempt to describe the everyday of a place that struggles for the most basic of human
rights, this video claims a perspective from within the domestic spaces of a territory that is complicated, derelict, and altogether impossible to separate from its political identity.

This image requires alt text, but the alt text is currently blank. Either add alt text or mark the image as decorative.Renée’s Room (2015) ~ 15 minutes. A film on the perpetual present as an enactment of the concept of the eternal return.
“This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more; and there will be nothing new in it, but every pain and every joy and every thought and sigh and everything unutterably small or great in your life will have to return to you, all in the same succession and sequence – even this spider and this moonlight between the trees, and even this moment and I myself. The eternal hourglass of existence is turned upside down again and again, and you with it, speck of dust!” Frederick Nietzsche


[photographer & projectionist, Jacob Barrera]

“Blackboard/Whiteboard”

an exploration of identity and social tension in America
performance art installation at                                                                   Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art
by Robert Eric Shoemaker, MFA candidate
Artistic Director of Poetry Is & Editor of Beats: A Naropan Periodical

• Produced at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art on March 2nd, 2017 from 5-8 pm:
1750 13th street, bmoca.org.
• Written and Performed by Robert Eric Shoemaker, in collaboration with Beats: A
Naropan Periodical and Poetry Is Productions.
• Free and open to the public.
• For more information, please visit http://poetryis.org or contact Eric at
robertericshoemaker@gmail.com.

Boulder, CO, 2.18.17 – Poetry Is and Beats: A Naropan Periodical team up to produce Robert
Eric Shoemaker’s solo performance/installation “Blackboard/Whiteboard” at the Boulder
Museum of Contemporary Art.
The installation will take place from 5-8 pm on March 2nd. The first performance begins at 6pm, with a ten-minute talk back to occur immediately after the 40-minute show. A second performance will begin at 7pm, with a discussion facilitated by performance artist Gabrielle Civil immediately following. Drinks will be served at the bar throughout the performances.
The Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art has opened its doors to the community. Artist Mathias Kessler dedicated space in his own exhibition for creative types to perform or present pieces that developed from Boulder’s cultural ecosystem. A different event occurs every Thursday.
Robert Eric Shoemaker, Artistic Director
Poetry Is Productions
robertericshoemaker@gmail.com
270.577.7782

Blackboard/Whiteboard is an installation as well as a 40-minutes performance piece. Please join me as I laugh, cry, and attempt to redefine what it means to be American today, and what
community and solidarity can look like.
“I’m not really here
I’m only the shape
of the emptiness
that holds me
the inner space
of those dancing
molecules
again
only in music”
– Cecilia Vicuña
The emptiness that is defining. Angular. “I am the space where I am” – Bachelard— and that space defines me in ways I can’t begin to know. I am a whiteboard.
How do we write about race without talking about color? How do we talk about color without comparison?

White in terms of white is not. Opposition becomes the only way to talk about color. Opposition as the space where we are, America today, defining ourselves— as in, “I am not that.”
I want to destroy the meaning of colors. I want to do it in performance. I want you to come up to this installation. And I hope you talk back. This is the premise of “Blackboard/Whiteboard”: to reference Toni Morrison’s “unspeakable things spoken”, to reference Gabrielle Civil’s translation of the body “into words on the page that
were written to be unheard”.
Let me break it down. I am creating a rebellion against structure as well as a celebration of difference in America.

“Blackboard/Whiteboard” is an attempt to complicate, intensely, our
relations to one another, but also to inspire us to be better.

About the ARTIST
Robert Eric Shoemaker (Writer & Performer) is a poet-playwright, theatre artist, and arts journalist. Eric is an MFA Candidate in Naropa University’s Creative Writing & Poetics program at the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Eric’s poetry and plays have been featured in “Mosaic”, “Tooth N’ Nail”, “Rollick”, “Literature
Emitting Diodes”, “Chicago After Dark”, “Thought Notebook”, “Baseball Bard”, 2017’s “Verde Que Te Quiero Verde”, and his debut collection “30 Days Dry” from Thought Collection Publishing. Eric’s second book of poetry is forthcoming from In Extenso Press, with a third on the way through Partial Press, both expected in 2017.
Follow his work at reshoemaker.com.
Robert Eric Shoemaker, Artistic Director
Poetry Is Productions
robertericshoemaker@gmail.com
270.577.7782

MORE ABOUT POETRY IS & BEATS
Poetry Is Productions brings poetry into all that we do, be it theatre, film, dance,
publishing, or a new style of project.
UPCOMING EVENTS:
“medea conjures dragons” workshop and showcase at Boulder Writers Warehouse,
March 25
“(Un)Bound Book Arts Workshop” April 23-May 7 at the Boulder Public Library
“medea conjures dragons” production in Fall 2017
Poetry Is Productions – Poetry Is (For You. For Me. For All.)
https://poetryis.org/
https://www.facebook.com/poetryis.productions/
Beats: A Naropan Periodical – Writing from a Place of Urgency
https://aplaceofurgency.com/
https://www.facebook.com/aplaceofurgency/


For additional information, please contact Robert Eric Shoemaker at 270.577.7782,
robertericshoemaker@gmail.com.

http://reshoemaker.com

Jack Kerouac School @ AWP

 

Photos by Anisah Ali, Garen Lavender, Swanee, Erika Hodges

My mother bites her nails, and I am not like her. I am the skin around her. —  How Ginsberg can I bed? — I am here and you are here but we are nowhere to be found. — Looked at the map unfolded on his lap. “Empire of ideas.” — I want to tell you I am coming. Please don’t Super Nova yet. — If learn is synonymous with teach, how is student not synonymous with teacher? — Remember who owned the land we now occupy.

These are all lines from the Student & Alumni reading on Saturday afternoon. Their voices on the foreground to the exhibit hall hum, the culmination of four days worth of book mongering, poetry-promoting, free-speech protesting, heritage, vigil and vigor. 

It was an inspiring long weekend, which began with our first visitor to our table of the weekend, Alice Notley, garbed in a white scarf with sky-blue owls on it. Between her and other old friends to bright, new faces inquiring to our graduate programs we had such visitors as to make us full on Community. And what we brought to give away, we gave it all– issues 41 & 42 of Bombay Gin, select broadsides and anthologies, ex libris stickers, and other sweet swag. 

And although everything happened at once, and we were sad not to see you all, Summer Writing Program is right around the corner to reunite our tribe of Bodhisattvas. 

4×4 Reading Series

No. 1, a review by Sarah Escue

The 4×4 reading series creates a space in which writers from various Colorado communities can join together and share their creative works. The first 4×4 reading was held in the Nalanda Events Center at Naropa University on November 29, 2016. The readers included Megan “Babs” Heise (Naropa), Meghan Pipe (Fort Collins), Natalie Rogers (CU Denver), and Kailey-Alyssa Tucker (CU Boulder).

The readers wrote and spoke of ghosts, pickled brine, crustaceans, Batman villains, a boy named Steve, NPR broadcasts, organs, black holes, mental illness, a/sexuality, starfish, insomnia, repression, expression, and memory. Each reader made the audience laugh, hum, and ponder. The barrier between artist and audience crumbled, the room was anything but stagnant. Everyone was silent, reverent, open, alive.

Megan Heise from Naropa says, “I think the 4×4 is an amazing opportunity to share one’s work and connect with the larger Front Range literary community, and I’m honored to have represented Naropa at the first reading of the 2016-2017 series. I’m eager to support my classmates reading in the next three, and to learn about the creative work of writers from the other schools represented.”

The 4×4 series is a  way to connect with the Colorado literary and art community. Upcoming 4×4 readings will be posted on the Jack Kerouac Schedule of Events.

 

Sarah Escue is earning her MFA in Creative Writing & Poetics in the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics.

Writers in Community Speakeasy

Dec. 6, 2016

The Writers in Community Speakeasy is a reading in which undergraduate and graduate writing students who are taking the course Writers in Community have the opportunity to come together and share the creative work they produced during the semester.

image7

Travis Newbill, MFA

Writer’s in Community is a course that engages several aspects of being a writer, from the page to performance, from innovative poetic concerns to professional development. Several working writers, such as Gabrielle Civil, Eugene Lim, and Muriel Leung, are invited to give in-class lectures and/or lead workshops. During this course, students also have the opportunity to explore contemplative gestures and writing processes, such as meditation, free movement, and more. By the course’s end, students have completed a context presentation, a prospectus proposing a project of their own, a creative portfolio based on the course’s focus of study, and a short professional dossier with career goals.

image8

Steve San Luis, BA

The WIC Speakeasy was held in the Nalanda Atrium on December 6, 2016. Students read poems and prose, and some even performed spoken word poetry. The readers and performers included: Ben Gross, Emily Duffy, Camille Craig, Eric Shoemaker, Chance Boatman, Jessica Down, Danielle Gardner, Joshua Musicant, Erika Hodges, Kaleb Worst, Holly Salvatore, Jack Eley, Kristiane Weeks, Julien Blundell, Paul Gomez, Kate Langyher, Ryan Mihaly, Lea Pendersen, Sarah Escue, Michele Lorusso Ortega, Shelly Robinson, Paige Frisone, Travis Newbill, Steve San Luis, and Grace Horton.

The Speakeasy was an energized space in which undergraduate and graduate writers could share their work, support each other, and chat over tacos post-reading. It was such an honor to read alongside so many talented and encouraging people. And it was an even bigger honor to hear their stories, poems, and songs.

Review & photos by:                                                                                     Sarah Escue is earning her MFA in Creative Writing & Poetics in the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics.

ATTN- HIRING!!!:

Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics is looking for an Assistant or Associate Professor – Creative Writing and Poetics!

Minimum Qualifications:
* MFA or PhD in Creative Writing or Literature.
* College-level teaching in creative writing and literary studies.
* One published book of innovative prose.
* Experience in teaching diverse innovative fiction, creative nonfiction, literature, and poetics.
* Computer skills, including Microsoft Office.
* Strong interpersonal and communication skills.
* An understanding of the dynamics of privilege and oppression, and the impact these have on equity, access, and opportunity in higher education/the workplace.
* Commitment to co-create an inclusive community and actively participate in related professional development, including openness to feedback and ongoing self-examination.

from-03-04-cataloghttps://workforcenow.adp.com/jobs/apply/posting.html…

“… hewn & forged…”

    Naropa University’s Jack Kerouac School
of Disembodied Poetics FA2016 Low-res weekend 

w/ Gabrielle Civil

When it began, the slow snake of the bass clarinet rose through a hiss of cymbals. Dancing in wavy extensions of her body, Gabrielle Civil circled a pile of books and pennies in the center of the stage-room. She picked up a book––Social Sciences––and, with it caressed to her chest, danced over to the audience and handed it off.

This was the beginning of the lecture-ritual-story-performance (let’s call it a presentation, in its traditional and medical references) of Gabrielle Civil’s “Against Oblivion” (which is not the title but makes a perfect stand-in for the memory of the evening). Her presentation ranged in modes, from dancing and musical accompaniment, to slide-show images and text, to poetry and ritualized audience participation. Each mode surrounded and elaborated on the first words Civil spoke, placing books down in different corners of the room: “This is my heart. These are my friends.”

As the presentation progressed, the conception of the “book” became mythic, came to include in its references the human soul, individuality, and community. Civil made it sacred:

 

“A book on the shelf has pinched her finger.

Diane Duane.              A book, the medicine.

The barrage of names. A spell A spell

All the things naming can do

(spreading the pennies blood-copper

pennies “and it was all blood and it was

all breaking”)

To defy oblivion –– to accept the past and

transform it. To make that book.”

 

But there was also an offering. So Civil told of her struggle to realize her book (her heart, her friend), and the forces acting against the book were the same as those that act against the liberation of humanity, and more specifically the liberation of African Americans from systematic oppression. Kevin Young’s conception of the “Shadow Book” haunted the stage. The Shadow Book occurs in three manifestations:

  1. The Lost Book. What was written and has disappeared.
  2. The Removed Book. Censured or lost, parts of this book are missing.
  3. The book that was never written. “Books the world didn’t want to exist.”

For the African-American writer the Shadow Book often falls within this third category. As life is denied, literature is denied existence. However, the Shadow Book, she stressed, is not the failure of the writer. It is the forces of oppression. “It is not your loss. It is a loss for all of us.” How do we carry the unwritten, the unbound book of loss, that which incurs, inflicts?: “A blessing is a wound and a gift.” Then, as spell, as solidification, the audience was called to name as many reasons as possible that keep a book from existence while Civil tore pages out of a paperback romance picked up from the stage display. The naming took on a physical presence, and scattered about the room lay the pages of “oblivion’s shadow.” To defy oblivion. To accept the past and transform it. To make that book.

At the heart of the presentation is the mantra: Books save lives. They are a project against oblivion. They are a ritual and an alchemical activation of the unwritten book/soul in you. They are both “a refuge, a possibility.”

To conclude the presentation Civil organized a circle in the center of the room, both convocation and invocation. Calling on all of our future books. “It was never about the book, it was about everything.”

reviewed by Julien Blundell

photo & video clip by Swanee