Category Archives: Alumni News

“Tidal Flats” chapbook by Christien Gholson, BA ’00

Bryn Mill Pipe, Swansea Bay, Photograph by Christien Gholson

Mudlark (Issue 63) , “Tidal Flats.” 

It is a long poem (25 sections, written in Swansea, Wales, between 2009 and 2011).

There are many threads within the poem, but one of the main threads is: how does the human mind absorb something as vast as climate change? There is an introduction that explains how the poem developed and what it is about.

One of the sections hearkens back to my time at Naropa, in Andrew Schelling’s Eco-poetry class, when we went on a tour of Rocky Flats (before it was turned into a combined superfund site and wildlife refuge).

Thanks and peace, Christien Gholson (Alumnus, ’00)

Bio: I am the author of a novel, A Fish Trapped Inside the Wind (Parthian Books, 2011) and two books of poetry, On the Side of the Crow (Hanging Loose Press, 2006) and All the Beautiful Dead (Bitter Oleander Press, 2016).

 

 

 

 

 

Prize for ‘Redwing Solitaire’

Redwing Solitaire, is a cycle of five short plays about leaving one’s home and how one can never really escape one’s home.

Before MWWC, Jefferson worked as an archivist for the Djuna Barnes Literary Estate managed by the Authors League Fund. Since 2007, he has taught in the English department of Southern Maine Community College. He earned degrees from Denison University (BA in English) and Naropa University (MFA in Writing & Poetics). His fiction and poetry have been published in Smokelong Quarterly, Hobart, Birkensnake, Quickfiction, Fairy Tale Review and many others. His plays have been produced in The Boston Theater Marathon, and multiple times in The Maine Playwrights Festival. He is the recipient of a Maine Arts Commission Good Idea Grant, and a Maine Literary Award for Drama.

When Jefferson wrote to us, announcing this wonderful achievement, he said, “As always, I couldn’t have done it without my Naropa education, and the friends I made there.”

 

Thank you Jeff, for Keeping the World Safe for Poetry!

MAINE LITERARY AWARDS

Alumni Publishes Paper

We had the pleasure of hearing from Matthew Pincus, now a PhD candidate at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He writes:

“It feels like it has been so long since Naropa even though it has only been a couple years. This Spring I was able to publish an article on Leslie Marmon Silko titled “Bewitched Policies of Resistance: America’s Legacy of Unknown Soldiers in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Storyteller” in a peer-reviewed journal called Transmodernity. It was a special issue of the journal that focused on Indigenous Knowledges and Indigenous Sites of Memory. The journal is open-access, and I was among other international scholars presenting on research about Indigenous cultures from South, Central and North America. It was incredible to have my work featured in this journal, and certainly the work I did at Naropa started this research and encouraged me to continue my work at UL-Lafayette.”

Congratulations on the publication Matthew!

Here’s the abstract:

Abstract Storyteller (1981) by Leslie Marmon Silko is a unique hybridized text of Laguna Myths centered on topics of Laguna Pueblo Citizens, and more generally Indigenous Southwestern Americans. “Tony’s Story,” “Uncle Tony’s Goat,” and “A Geronimo Story” are three tales where characters are agents of political resistance against injustices enacted by the American Military and law enforcement over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Each story subverts the dominant “white” narrative of American politics and history through use of traditional Laguna Pueblo values linked to the inseparable geographical terrain they call home. In “Tony’s Story,” the protagonist and his friend enact a revenge narrative on a racist cop who abuses his power, thus commenting on modern-day police brutality. A cop is killed, and rain at the end of the story acts as an emergent symbol of freedom creating an age of peace against the violence that has patrolled its borders. “Uncle Tony’s Goat,” about a billy goat who refuses to be penned in, acts as a metaphorical bridge to “A Geronimo Story,” where historical Apache chief, Geronimo, also a mythical folk legend in American culture, escapes and evades the American military. Geronimo was originally captured and imprisoned by American colonial militaristic forces, but in Silko’s reimagining he is an elusive figure only known to the cavalry by name. In these stories, characters become free to interact and commune with the land, and sites of invasion and theft from the indigenous become sites of reverence and remembrance.

Click here for the full article!

Jack Kerouac School @ AWP

 

Photos by Anisah Ali, Garen Lavender, Swanee, Erika Hodges

My mother bites her nails, and I am not like her. I am the skin around her. —  How Ginsberg can I bed? — I am here and you are here but we are nowhere to be found. — Looked at the map unfolded on his lap. “Empire of ideas.” — I want to tell you I am coming. Please don’t Super Nova yet. — If learn is synonymous with teach, how is student not synonymous with teacher? — Remember who owned the land we now occupy.

These are all lines from the Student & Alumni reading on Saturday afternoon. Their voices on the foreground to the exhibit hall hum, the culmination of four days worth of book mongering, poetry-promoting, free-speech protesting, heritage, vigil and vigor. 

It was an inspiring long weekend, which began with our first visitor to our table of the weekend, Alice Notley, garbed in a white scarf with sky-blue owls on it. Between her and other old friends to bright, new faces inquiring to our graduate programs we had such visitors as to make us full on Community. And what we brought to give away, we gave it all– issues 41 & 42 of Bombay Gin, select broadsides and anthologies, ex libris stickers, and other sweet swag. 

And although everything happened at once, and we were sad not to see you all, Summer Writing Program is right around the corner to reunite our tribe of Bodhisattvas. 

Kerouac School Alum featured on GonzoToday

Bradon Lee (MFA Class of 2015) was recently featured on Gonzo Today. His piece “Straight From Hell Into The Kentucky Derby” outlines his recent trip to Kentucky to cover the derby and his run in with “the inbred court system.”

Image by Ralph Steadman

Beat Reading for Boulder Arts Week

Boulder Arts Week highlights Boulder’s distinguished arts and cultural programming and includes art walks, First Friday, exhibitions, performances, dance, music, theatre, artist demonstrations, lectures, readings, workshops, and symposia.

Join students and alumni from the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics as they honor our Beat lineage:


The Beat Drags On

Kerouac School Alum Angel Dominguez’s Black Lavender Milk Just Published

Timeless, Infinite Light has published JKS alumn Angel Dominguez’s Black Lavender Milk.

Black Lavender Milk is an experimental lyric that dreamt of becoming a novel only to wake up as notebook. Employing and smudging elements of poetry, prose and memoir, Black Lavender Milk offers the space of a “novel” as a site of mourning, inquiry and recuperation. Through a complex, hypnotic blur of language, the lyric-as-novel functions as an extended meditation on Writing in relation to the Body; Time, Loss, Ancestry and Dreaming.