Category Archives: What Where Series

Bright Impossibility: Sarah Escue with Amy Wright

 

Amy Wright is a poet, author, and Associate Professor of Creative Writing at Austin Peay State University. Amy is the Nonfiction Editor of Zone 3 Press and Zone 3 Journal and the author of four poetry chapbooks: There Are No New Ways to Kill a Man (Apostrophe Books), Farm (Finishing Line Press), The Garden Will Give You A Fat Lip, won the 2012 Pavement Saw Chapbook Contest. Dancing Girl Press published her fourth chapbook, Rhinestones in the Bed, or Cracker Crumbs, in 2014. Her newest collection of nonfiction essays Wherever the Land Is (miel, 2016) was published earlier this year. Amy’s writing appears in a number of journals including Kenyon Review, Southern Poetry Anthology (Volumes III and VI) and Tupelo Quarterly. She was awarded a Peter Taylor Fellowship for the Kenyon Review Writers’ Workshop, an Individual Artist’s Fellowship from the Tennessee Arts Commission, and a fellowship to the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts (VCCA).

 

Sarah Escue: One of the many intriguing aspects about Wherever the Land Is are your translations of Sappho and Emily Dickinson. Why did you choose to translate these particular authors and bodies of work?

 

Amy Wright: Emily Dickinson is the first poet whose poems I loved and memorized, yet even after years of reading her poems as a girl then as an undergraduate and graduate student, they were still wild with mystery. I knew from translating for my Master’s thesis the poetry of Peruvian poet César Vallejo that translation lends incredible intimacy to another’s work, so I used it to gain additional access to her poems. It was a way of adopting her as a mentor and trying to determine what characterizes feminine authority.

 

Sappho I undertook later with an additional objective. So much of the lyric’s origins have been reduced to mere slivers that I wanted to give the remaining fragments the attention they warrant. Translation helped me step through the doors that Anne Carson’s bracketed translations left open.

 

SE: How would you describe the movement of translation, adaption, and reclamation throughout this book?

 

AW: I think of this particular form of what I call poetry-to-prose translations as another medium. Language-to-language translations have a different relationship and responsibility to their originals. We already have Sappho and Dickinson’s poems in English, so I couldn’t contribute on that level, but I could offer my side of the conversation they initiated with one 21st century Appalachian-American reader. I could infuse my response to the call I hear within her work with the reasons I celebrate and honor it. And in carrying her lines into readings, which are themselves lyric, I could strum them against the shifting context through which they continue to live.

 

SE: Was there a specific text or author that first attracted you to translation? How do you enter a translation without changing the original text’s context?

 

AW: Stephen Mitchell’s translation of Rilke’s Duino Elegies first showed me the power of great translation. Rather than disguising his relationship to Rilke’s work—and Lao Tzu’s and Homer’s, and Job’s and the many other writers he’s translated—he integrates the context in which the work is being read with the one in which it was written. A change in context is inevitable. That these works remain in circulation and in various translations is a testament not to their lack of change but to their responsiveness to change. Embracing how these works currently resonate with him helps bridge their preserved wisdom and contemporary understanding, but that is because he is an exceptionally perceptive reader. The best translators are necessarily first great readers.

 

What I am working to create is not a facsimile but another work altogether—an apple in itself, if one that falls not far from the tree from which it sprung.

 

SE: Is translation a type of appropriation? Is translation a public or private act?

 

AW: For me, translation is both public and private in the way that grief is both. I use this unlikely comparison because one of the great gifts I noticed after my brother’s death was that the family members and friends would bring me the most precious thing imaginable at that time—more memories of him. Since my ability to make new ones with him was gone, I reveled in the ones they shared. Translation can be a similar means of preserving memories and relationships to work we love. Unless someone finds a long-lost Dickinson or Sappho poem, we only have what we can now offer in response—across language or media. It’s a public, or communal, offering that we receive in quite personal and internal ways.

 

SE: When does a translated text lose its original context? When this happens, is the work still considered a translation, or is it an adaptation or separate body of work altogether? Do you have any advice for individuals new to literary translation?

 

AW: Perhaps I should, but I don’t think of the context for a translation as a physical space akin to the setting for a play or a cathedral ceiling mural. I think of translation as a means of communicating across time or country or language or media potentially universal insights. Translators of poetry have additional responsibilities to retain the music and what Benjamin calls the “essence” of the original—but those original works do not seem to me separate from what has come before. Rather, they resound age-old notes newly combined. They evolve meaning in relation to changing conditions. They add to what is matter and not air, by building on centuries of human work and error.

 

I would advise language-to-language translators differently than poetry-to-prose or other kinds of experimental translators. Both need to first be exceptional readers whose readings complement, complicate, or otherwise augment the originals. But language-to-language translators also need to become like Coleman Barks, whose translations of Rumi evidence a profound depth of understanding while casting the light of himself onto the page only to illuminate the text. Poetry-to-prose or other translators have a different opportunity to celebrate the making new. Like the best song covers, they are original in themselves, so of course they don’t always work. I’ve tossed out a number of attempts myself, and there are more than enough bland Dylan covers that fail to bring voices as individual as his. But wouldn’t I tune in to Joanna Newsom’s version of “Tangled Up in Blue?” So, probably the best thing an experimental translator might do is to first train her own voice to carry as far as it can.

 

SE: Ownership and movement play prominent roles in Wherever the Land Is. Stolen or hidden paintings by Vermeer, Rembrandt, and Degas are reimagined, quite beautifully I might add. These paintings were stolen years ago and are in unknown locations where the public can’t view them. Can a person or culture truly own art? When art is stolen or hidden, is it still considered art? Can art become an artifact?

 

AW: Thanks for saying so. Your question reminds me of Dickinson’s poem 348 “I would not paint—a picture —” because the speaker prefers to be, rather than the painter, “the One / Its bright impossibility / To dwell — delicious — on—.” Contemplating a work of art, she makes apparent, is central to the work of art as such. Like a tree falling in a forest that no one hears, does it make a sound? If your definition of sound requires the meeting with a human eardrum, it does not, although the falling tree still emits sound waves. A work of art maintains its “bright impossibility” even when the channel between observer and work is broken, but I would say it animates through that exchange. A work of art, though, differs from a tree, which lives in its own right and as plant science has begun to reveal would sense the sonic vibration, if not with ears.

 

In the case of the works stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardener Art Museum, it is possible that they were removed from the public eye for the sake of a select and smaller audience, which complicates how one thinks about that channel of animation. I hope it does remain open, even in a more limited form, as it means the works remain intact somewhere. It’s also possible that they were reclaimed as national treasures, which opens a broader question of ethics. I would not hazard a fixed answer about how to handle all art, but I would say a sign of respect for work that has long outlived its artist is to entrust it to the care of its ancestors. It’s an ethical debate I felt especial empathy toward after the loss of my only brother. Given enough time—as in the 20,000-year-old Paleolithic paintings in the Lascaux Caves—one can see art become artifact and conduit of multifarious human stories.

 

SE: Why is the relationship between text and image important? What’s your process for blending text and image? Do you experiment with other mediums, such as painting or sculpture? How does experimenting with various art forms inform your writing?

 

AW: I was making a lot of color pencil drawings when I drafted this essay—simplistic and minimalist due as much to my drawing skills as to my aesthetic. Right now I am folding origami animals, which I send through the post to friends. Working with my hands helps me quiet thought and free my mind to listen to the rhythms that arise. Images fire in another region of the brain and light new paths toward understanding. I’m just grateful that new media helps me build on that potential.

 

SE: Exploring the restorative power of the creative process is a large part of this book. How has writing and the creative process helped you overcome hardships and heartbreak over the years? What was it like writing about your brother several years after his passing? How can the arts unite and heal a community?

 

AW: There is a beautiful line in Helen MacDonald’s H is for Hawk in which she is tracing a key her now-deceased father had taped on a card for her. In doing so she recognizes the shape of her love for him, and the way her grief has opened into something else. The absence of a lost person will always be with us, if at varying times harder to bear. What writing or drawing can do is similar to those new memories I said loved ones brought me after Jeremy’s funeral: they can add to the story that ended too soon. They can empower me not to change it but to create a protected space to mourn. Grieving is healthy and should be well honored, as it teaches us the depth and breadth and height and width of our love for another person. I had no idea my capacity was so vast until I felt the infinite space his loss opened up. Art can help us trust ourselves enough to risk that.

 

Sarah Escue is earning her MFA in Creative Writing & Poetics in the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics.

Review of What Where Series: Maureen Owen, Stephen Graham Jones, and TC Tolbert, October 28, 2014

By Jennifer van Alstyne

Andrea Rexilius introduced our fourth and final What Where Series Reading of 2014. Maureen Owen is the author of nine books of poetry, including Edges of Water (Chax Press, 2013) Erosion’s Pull (Coffee House Press, 2006). American Rush: Selected Poems was a finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize. Owens’ language created a juxtaposition of concrete language and imagist depictions of the body creating very intentional choices for soundwork. I particularly enjoyed her long titles, such as “Weren’t We Also Written in that Order or Saturated So?” We are always pleased to have Owen, former JKS faculty and a longtime friend of the University, return.

Stephen Graham Jones is the author of 16 novels and six story collections, most recently, Floating Boy and the Girl Who Couldn’t Fly (ChiZine Publications, 2013) and After the People Lights Have Gone Off (Dark House Press, 2014). At the start of his reading, Jones said, “Every time you get a new favorite poem, your head changes. It ripples.” Words have the power to change us. Jones read from a piece called “How to Know You’re A Killer” which included number seven:

“Another way you know you’re killer through and through is that you can’t stop with the lists, they’re everywhere, and they’re all so necessary, they’re all so perfect, so elegant, so right, they each take so many drafts to get them that right, but the main way you know you’re a killer is that you’re not on a single one of these lists.”

This was followed by a short piece on final girls in horror movies. “This,” he said, “is a baptism in blood.” Jones teaches in the English department at the University of Colorado – Boulder.

TC Tolbert is the author of Gephyromania (Ahsahta Press, 2014), Conditions/Conditioning (New Lights Press, 2014) I: Not He: Not I(Pity Milk, 2014), spirare (Belladonna, 2012), and territories of folding (Kore Press, 2011), He is also co-editor of Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics (Nightboat, 2013) with Trace Peterson, who presented at the Jack Kerouac School’s Queer Poetics Symposium in Spring 2014. Tolbert’s reading was a bit unconventional in the best possible way. He invited the audience to form a triangle with the stage and read with three audience members, each at a corner of the triangle. Tolbert tore down the wall between audience and performer, echoing his poem: “to break a singular thing that is also plural.” Polyphony filled Naropa’s Performing Arts Center as Tolbert’s colloquial but exact language allowed for a shared moment. Tolbert gave a talk in the 2014 Writer’s in Community Class and can be found here for Naropa students, faculty, and staff.

Thank you to our guests for providing a wonderful ending to our 2014 What Where Series. For a listing of our other JKS 40th Anniversary Events, please click here.

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Jennifer van Alstyne has been published in the Eunoia Review, Crack the Spine, Midwest Literary Magazine, The Monmouth Review, The Foundling Review, Paper Nautilus, Poetry Quarterly, and Whiskey Traveler. Her collection, “Scansioned Music: A Glenn Gould Collection”, was published in Crossroads 2013 for which she was the winner of the Jane Freed Grant. She is currently an Associate Editor for Something On Paper and Book Reviews Editor for Bombay Gin.

Review of the What Where Series: Teresa Carmody, HR Hegnauer, and CAConrad, October 21, 2014

By Jennifer van Alstyne

Andrea Rexilius introduced the third reading of the semester, on the day of Reed Bye’s birthday. After the audience sang, Teresa Carmody took the stage.

Carmody is the author of Requiem (Les Figues. 2005), and chapbooks Eye Hole Adore (PS Books. 2008), and Your Spiritual Suit of Armor by Katherine Anne (Woodland Editions, 2009). She read from a new project, Maison Femme, which coming out from Bonair Projects, a micropress out of Buffalo. It is a collaboration between Carmody and poet Vanessa Place, who did the images for the project. “Maison Femme, or housewife, is a roman à clef about two lesbians who run a small press out of their basement. You should also know that the manuscript is structured that it has a section for each room or area of the house and each section has as many sentences as my feet across one way and then the other,” Carmody said. Her humor shone through as she read a section of Maison Femme called “Back Upstairs Porch,” in which she mentioned the thinly veiled Jack Kerouac School’s Summer Writing Program. The laughter didn’t stop throughout the reading which was filled with rich detail and language.

HR Hegnauer is a book designer, JKS alumna, and author of Sir (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs 2013). After thanking the audience for missing the first game of the World Series for the reading, she read from her manuscript, When the Bird is Not Human. It is during such a reading that one recognizing the need for poetry to be heard sometimes, not just read; Hegnauer’s pitch and tone changed like the sparrow she spoke of in a way that could not be voiced on the page. Our own Anne Waldman says, “HR Hegnauer has created an epistolary identity of engaged and hybridized increments from her own youthful living and details of others and their entwined poetries and presences. It is a highly performative text of depth, mind grammar, and beautiful gesture, inhabited by vivid characters and voices that change and charge the room.” That beautiful gesture was apparent in her reading.

Our final reader of the evening was CAConrad. Conrad is the author of ECODEVIANCE: (Soma)tics for the Future Wilderness (Wave Books, 2014), Philip Seymour Hoffman (were you high when you said this?) (Worms Press, 2014), and five others. Conrad’s somatic exercises are familiar to those who have attended his lectures and panels (most recently at the JKS [Dis]embodied Poetics Conference in October), this past Summer Writing Program, or his discussion with the 2014 Writers in Community class. In “Reading Starlight with One Eye Like Creeley,” Conrad says, “we were all once young and/ beautiful squandering everything/ it’s what we came here to do.” Conrad speaks what many would not, bringing us into a space of “Sharking into the Birdcage,” which he provided free broadsides of to the audience.

For a listing of our other JKS 40th Anniversary Events, please click here.

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Jennifer van Alstyne has been published in the Eunoia Review, Crack the Spine, Midwest Literary Magazine, The Monmouth Review, The Foundling Review, Paper Nautilus, Poetry Quarterly, and Whiskey Traveler. Her collection, Scansioned Music: A Glenn Gould Collection, was published in Crossroads 2013 for which she was the winner of the Jane Freed Grant. She is currently an Associate Editor for Something On Paper and Book Reviews Editor for Bombay Gin.

What Where Series: Readings by TC Tolbert, Maureen Owen, and Stephen Graham Jones, Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Please join for our final What Where Series of the semester! This event is free and open to the public. We hope to see you there!

what where 1

What Where Series: Readings by TC Tolbert, Maureen Owen, Stephen Graham Jones

Tuesday, October 28

7:30 PM

PAC (Performing Arts Center)

Naropa University

Book signing to follow—book purchases are CASH ONLY.

Photography by Mamta Popat

TC Tolbert often identifies as a trans and genderqueer feminist, collaborator, dancer, and poet but really s/he’s just a human in love with humans doing human things. The author of Gephyromania (Ahsahta Press 2014), Conditions/Conditioning (a collaborative chapbook with Jen Hofer, New Lights Press, 2014) I: Not He: Not I (Pity Milk chapbook 2014), Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics (co-editor with Trace Peterson, Nightboat Books, 2013), spirare (Belladonna* chaplet, 2012), and territories of folding (Kore Press chapbook 2011), his favorite thing in the world is Compositional Improvisation (which is another way of saying being alive). S/he is Assistant Director of Casa Libre, faculty in the low residency MFA program at OSU-Cascades, and adjunct faculty at University of Arizona. S/he spends his summers leading wilderness trips for Outward Bound. Thanks to Movement Salon and the Architects, TC keeps showing up and paying attention. Gloria Anzaldúa said, Voyager, there are no bridges, one builds them as one walks. John Cage said, it’s lighter than you think.

Owen_Maureen

Maureen Owen is a poet, editor and publisher currently living in Denver, CO. She is the author of eleven books of poetry, most recently Edges of Water from Chax Press. Her title Erosion’s Pull from Coffee House Press was a finalist for the Colorado Book Award and the Balcones Poetry Prize. Her collection American Rush: Selected Poems was a finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize and her work AE (Amelia Earhart) was a recipient of the prestigious Before Columbus American Book Award. She has most recently published work in The Denver Quarterly, Vanitas, New American Writing, and Bombay Gin. An instructor of numerous workshops and classes in poetry and book production, her awards include grants from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the Fund for Poetry and a Poetry Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. She has taught at Naropa University, both on campus and in the low-residency MFA Creative Writing Program, and served as editor-in-chief of Naropa’s on-line zine not enough night. She can be found reading her work on the PennSound website.

Graham Jones_Stephen

Stephen Graham Jones is the author of 16 novels and six story collections, so far. Most recent are Floating Boy and the Girl Who Couldn’t Fly and After the People Lights Have Gone Off.

 

Naropa University welcomes participants with disabilities. Please contact Ariella Ruth at 303-546-3581 or agoldberg@naropa.edu to inquire about accessibility and discuss disability accommodations needed to participate fully in this event.

What Where Series: Readings by CAConrad, Teresa Carmody, and HR Hegnauer, Tuesday, October 21, 2014

We are pleased to announce our third What Where Series of the semester! This event is free and open to the public. We hope to see you there!

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What Where Series: Readings by CAConrad, Teresa Carmody, and HR Hegnauer

Tuesday, October 21

7:30 PM

PAC (Performing Arts Center)

Conrad_CA

CAConrad is the author of seven books including ECODEVIANCE: (Soma)tics for the Future Wilderness (Wave Books, 2014), A BEAUTIFUL MARSUPIAL AFTERNOON (Wave Books, 2012) and The Book of Frank (Wave Books, 2010). A 2014 Lannan Fellow, a 2013 MacDowell Fellow, and a 2011 Pew Fellow, he also conducts workshops on (Soma)tic poetry and Ecopoetics. He has been commissioned to write (Soma)tic Poetry Rituals for the Pulitzer Foundation, the Wagner Institute of Science and other places. Visit him online at http://CAConrad.blogspot.com

Carmody_Teresa

Teresa Carmody’s books include Maison Femme (a collaboration with Vanessa Place, forthcoming from Bon Aire Projects), Requiem (Les Figues, 2005), and three chapbooks: I Can Feel (Insert Press, 2012), Eye Hole Adore (PS Books, 2008), and Your Spiritual Suit of Armor by Katherine Anne (Woodland Editions, 2009). She is a co-founding editor of Les Figues Press, and the co-editor of its anthology I’ll Drown My Book: Conceptual Writing By Women (2012). She is currently pursing a PhD in English/Creative Writing at the University of Denver.

Hegnauer_HR

HR Hegnauer is the author of the Sir (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs). Her work has also appeared in many journals, online, and in the anthologies Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics and A Poetic Inventory of Rocky Mountain National Park. HR is a member of the feminist publishing collaborative Belladonna*, and the poets’ theater group GASP: Girls Assembling Something Perpetual. She received her MFA in Writing & Poetics from Naropa University, where she has also taught in the Summer Writing Program. HR is a book designer and website designer specializing in working with independent publishers as well as individual artists and writers.

Naropa University welcomes participants with disabilities. Please contact Ariella Ruth at 303-546-3581 or agoldberg@naropa.eduto inquire about accessibility and discuss disability accommodations needed to participate fully in this event.

Review of the What Where Series: Janice Gould, Kurt Gutjahr, Rachel Levitsky, September 30, 2014

By Jennifer van Alstyne

David Mutschecner, an MFA candidate at the Jack Kerouac School, introduced Janice Gould, a Koyangk’auwi Maidu writer, whose “silence and landscape” echo both Bishop and Snyder. She thanked and greeted him by saying, “What is your earth?” in her tribal language. Gould, the author of Earthquake Weather: Poems (University of Arizona 1996), read to us from her collection: a mixture of love poems and sestinas rich with anaphora and history, her “lungs full of indigenous air,” (“Indian Mascot, 1959”). She brought with her to the stage, “a procession of ghosts,” in which the act and process of writing were revealed in a post-confessional pouring of love, lineage, and rain.

Kurt Gutjahr, Program Director for the American Center for the West and adjunct faculty member at Naropa, read from a short story, a piece of flash fiction called “How Not to Write a Novel,” and an excerpt from his manuscript. The flash fiction piece, perhaps most pertinent for writing students, is an exercise in what not to do, but how to write about it successfully. The piece outlines all the steps a novelist might take in order to construct a manuscript, everything from smoking pot for six months without writing a word, to sitting in bars, because “that’s where characters live–in bars.” The entire piece is a lesson of discipline, but the last line is both vulnerable and perhaps the most pertinent: “This is not about leaving words behind; this is not about fear…and then it is.”

Rachel Levitsky, the third reader of the evening, is the author of Under the Sun (Futurepoem 2003), NEIGHBOR (UDP 2009). Renoemos (Delete Press 2010), and The Story of My Accident is Ours (Futurepoem 2011). The 2014 Writers in Community class read The Story of My Accident is Ours (Futurepoem 2011), a text dissecting social and political injustices within America. In her visit to the Writers in Community class, she used somatic gestures to invoke an embodiment and awareness of self in one’s community, and how those issues pertain to the individual, and how they are housed, or posited in the self. She read from new work, but also started with a letter to Alex Dimitrov of the Poetry Foundation, who in the highbrow world of upper echelon literary magazines, never returned Levitsky’s emails. Her poem “Sentence One” created a melancholic love ode out of a perfunctory correspondence e-mail. Also, Levitsky discussed her collaborative work with artist/editor Susan Bee.

We hope to see you all at the next What Where Series  with readings by CAConrad, Teresa Carmody, and HR Hegnauer on Tuesday, October 21, 2014 at 7:30pm in Naropa’s Performing Arts Center (PAC).

For a listing of our other JKS 40th Anniversary Events, please click here.

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Jennifer van Alstyne has been published in the Eunoia Review, Crack the Spine, Midwest Literary Magazine, The Monmouth Review, The Foundling Review, Paper Nautilus, Poetry Quarterly, and Whiskey Traveler. Her collection, Scansioned Music: A Glenn Gould Collection, was published in Crossroads 2013 for which she was the winner of the Jane Freed Grant. She is currently an Associate Editor for Something On Paper and Book Reviews Editor for Bombay Gin. has been published in the Eunoia Review, Crack the Spine, Midwest Literary Magazine, The Monmouth Review, The Foundling Review, Paper Nautilus, Poetry Quarterly, and Whiskey Traveler. Her collection, Scansioned Music: A Glenn Gould Collection, was published in Crossroads 2013 for which she was the winner of the Jane Freed Grant. She is currently an Associate Editor for Something On Paper and Book Reviews Editor for Bombay Gin.

Review of the What Where Series: Tina Brown Celona, Bin Ramke, and Miranda Mellis September 16, 2014

By Jennifer van Alstyne

Three completely different readers graced the PAC stage on Tuesday evening, September 16: Tina Brown Celona, Bin Ramke, and Miranda Mellis. All were poets, and all brought new perspectives on craft and subject to the Naropa stage. It was a great opening to the 2014 What Where Series which also coincides with Naropa University’s 40th Anniversary.

Tina Brown Celona’s feminist poetry, also a graduate of Denver University’s Doctorate program in Creative Writing, was a nice segway from Sara Veghlan’s prose, from the inaugural Bombay Gin 2014 reading series at Innisfree, and SWP 2014 faculty member Dodie Bellamy. Her reading of “Sunday Morning Cunt Poem” tended to use the same revision of the pejorative term to achieve it as an ownership, or a reclaiming by the other sex as Bellamy and Acker did before her in a time when Women’s issues in the workplace and at home have been prevalent in national media. The blend of personal, the revisioning of the love poem, and stark language, allowed for suspension of reality through writing: “With the cunt poems I could have orgasms during sex. I had long, luxurious hair, which I wrapped around my throat like a scarf. You could say I was ‘released from my prison.’ My therapist was no longer busy.”

Bin Ramke took us to a realm between mathematics, physics, and etymology–the trisected angle present along with tales of time, space, and personal life. Ramke’s moonscapes tie in closely with his interview with our own assistant professor, J’lyn Chapman, which was published in audio form on The Conversant and in text in the latest issue of Something On Paper. He read from his latest collection, Missing the Moon (Omnidawn, 2014). Ramke’s poem, “After Audubon” on the naming of birds, states, “To be named for the sound you make, Poet, / without intent, without meaning.” This precision with etymology and semantics creates meaning in not only each line, but each word on the page.

Miranda Mellis, the author of The Revisionist, The Spokes, None of This Is Real, The Quarry, and Materialisms, read from an imagined book review, which brought a new perspective of contemplative poetics via a review that fights political injustice and comments on socioeconomics in a world which she has both created and critiqued. It was lovely to have a Naropa alumna return to campus to read and teach a lecture earlier in the day to the MFA program’s Writers in Community course, for which the students read one of her books. Her latest chapbook, The Quarry, is out from Traffiker Press.

Overall, it was a wonderful reading to open the What Where Series, the next installment of which is on September 30, 2014 in the Performing Arts Center (PAC) and will feature Rachel Levitsky, Kurt Gutjahr, and Janice Gould.

For a listing of our other JKS 40th Anniversary Events, please click here.

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Jennifer van Alstyne has been published in the Eunoia Review, Crack the Spine, Midwest Literary Magazine, The Monmouth Review, The Foundling Review, Paper Nautilus, Poetry Quarterly, and Whiskey Traveler. Her collection, Scansioned Music: A Glenn Gould Collection, was published in Crossroads 2013 for which she was the winner of the Jane Freed Grant. She is currently an Associate Editor for Something On Paper and Book Reviews Editor for Bombay Gin.