Category Archives: Student News

the Ultimate review / New Weathers / Evaporation

Oh my people, oh my people.

I write to you calm and weary from the transcendent storm of SWP. In this second half of our time, we witnessed endless refractions of light in the form of performance—bright practices of refusal transmitted through our friends and teachers. Knowledge as refuge, as Giovanni Singleton would say. I know you are tired, but stay with me here. I’ve found the connective tissue between these refractions—an alchemical algorithm for shelter, community, and the transition of anger into poetry.

Anne Waldman’s Lecture, “Gimme Shelter” / photo slide by Caroline Swanson, Assistant to the [SWP] Creative Director
It begins with faith. Moving lightly in fugitive fashion, Erik Ehn restored my convictions. “We can’t transcend ourselves without a sense of faith. Faith is living out of our control, which is a realistic state. When we are out of control, we need help.” Thus, interdependence forms from faith—faith in poetry, faith in healing, and faith in others. Protection takes hold.

Sanctuary then occurs when we realize our responsibility to others. Layli Long Soldier commented on the Lakota people’s gesture towards the innate responsibilities we have in our relationships. From her we learned to keep the sound of our lineage alive so others may rely on us—to contain and preserve.

In this space of humanistic bond, time slows down. We are able to heal. Julie Patton tells us to “Stop. Look. Listen. Make a space for grief.” This is how we begin transition—anger transmutes in stillness (Ronaldo Wilson’s sexual revenge on James Comey comes to mind). The alchemical process of poetics meeting oppression within community is in full force. The shelter creates a restorative delay, and new work is born.

Ronaldo Wilson & class, colloquium offering

There were so many openings. It felt as if hundreds of blessings hit me at once. We were granted beatific visions from Steven Taylor’s resurrections of Blake.  Julie Patton and Janice Lowe dropped us into rivers of elegant, profound music. The little moments linger too—the confusion, hilarity, loneliness. The dancing. I am grateful, loudly and quietly. As we disperse from our pocket of angels, I remember (one of) Anne Waldman’s incantations, given to us during her panel: “minds never come from nothing, or go to nothing.” In this nature, the SWP spirit survives through all of our work, the good work.

Jeff Pethybridge, & Anne Waldman, ‘the long thank you’

Thank you SWP Warriors. Thank you faculty and staff. Thank you students. I hope my passion fuel yours. Your homework is to keep going, and repeat after me: I love you.

 

Yours,

Gabriella Reamer

Faculty Liaison

 

Mid-Summer’s Day / New Weathers’ / Review

Summer Writing Program, Review

of Week 1 & 2

 

 

I write to you, a day past midsummer and a day past mid summer-writing program. The anthropocene continues with a heavy geological and social current. Resisting, delaying, we do the good work—learning and writing and loving—along with these rising temperatures. At SWP, we’ve already experienced with all senses the vast counter-patterns these “New Weathers” have subsequently rippled into with poetics and discussion. Last week, Roger Reeves cited Adrienne Rich in her poem “Dreamwood” when discussing how to dismantle the New Weathers of our time: “…poetry isn’t a revolution but a way of knowing why it must come.” And so, as our bubble of deep thinkers meditate on the skeleton of our country, we have all also created—and witnessed—deconstructions, realms of defiance and prediction, and open pockets of awareness for the healing to come through. We have learned from Brenda Coultas how to document our local manifestations of decay in poetry. Azareen Oloomi encouraged us to “read widely and with vigor.” Eileen Myles told the secret to taking care of ourselves is (sometimes) getting a dog. And always, in the gifted eye of each of us, there is the knowing of watching a poet as they work—Mairead, Jeffery, or Anne weaving fibrous tapestries of SWP magic behind a humble curtain—that gives us the wisdom of generosity and dedication—helping us communally return what has been given to us as writers. In other words, we are becoming meteorologists.

Increasingly we are hearing the cutting truth revealed by our teachers—that these Weathers are not actually New. C.A. Conrad spoke to this on his panel: “Things have been fucked up for a long time.” Following up on his own threads of heart-mind activism, Conrad noted that political atrocities against the gay community have not only been happening for too long, but are also on the rise—with over 300 anti-gay and lesbian laws passed in 2017 so far. “Everybody needs to be an activist, and simultaneously creative,” Conrad said as pens flew across the pages in the windy, high vibrational PAC.

There is a lot to be grateful for. Hope is rising up and we become lighter with knowledge and nourishing poetry. Your homework is to tell the people around you that you love them, stay in the now and the unknown, and read to wake up, my dear SWP warriors. Write to wake others.

 

—Gabriella Reamer, Faculty Liaison

Photos by SWP New Weathers assistants & Director: Erika Hodges, Shawnie Hamer, Garen-Lavender Whitmore, Swanee, & Jeff Pethybridge

“Blackboard/Whiteboard”

an exploration of identity and social tension in America
performance art installation at                                                                   Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art
by Robert Eric Shoemaker, MFA candidate
Artistic Director of Poetry Is & Editor of Beats: A Naropan Periodical

• Produced at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art on March 2nd, 2017 from 5-8 pm:
1750 13th street, bmoca.org.
• Written and Performed by Robert Eric Shoemaker, in collaboration with Beats: A
Naropan Periodical and Poetry Is Productions.
• Free and open to the public.
• For more information, please visit http://poetryis.org or contact Eric at
robertericshoemaker@gmail.com.

Boulder, CO, 2.18.17 – Poetry Is and Beats: A Naropan Periodical team up to produce Robert
Eric Shoemaker’s solo performance/installation “Blackboard/Whiteboard” at the Boulder
Museum of Contemporary Art.
The installation will take place from 5-8 pm on March 2nd. The first performance begins at 6pm, with a ten-minute talk back to occur immediately after the 40-minute show. A second performance will begin at 7pm, with a discussion facilitated by performance artist Gabrielle Civil immediately following. Drinks will be served at the bar throughout the performances.
The Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art has opened its doors to the community. Artist Mathias Kessler dedicated space in his own exhibition for creative types to perform or present pieces that developed from Boulder’s cultural ecosystem. A different event occurs every Thursday.
Robert Eric Shoemaker, Artistic Director
Poetry Is Productions
robertericshoemaker@gmail.com
270.577.7782

Blackboard/Whiteboard is an installation as well as a 40-minutes performance piece. Please join me as I laugh, cry, and attempt to redefine what it means to be American today, and what
community and solidarity can look like.
“I’m not really here
I’m only the shape
of the emptiness
that holds me
the inner space
of those dancing
molecules
again
only in music”
– Cecilia Vicuña
The emptiness that is defining. Angular. “I am the space where I am” – Bachelard— and that space defines me in ways I can’t begin to know. I am a whiteboard.
How do we write about race without talking about color? How do we talk about color without comparison?

White in terms of white is not. Opposition becomes the only way to talk about color. Opposition as the space where we are, America today, defining ourselves— as in, “I am not that.”
I want to destroy the meaning of colors. I want to do it in performance. I want you to come up to this installation. And I hope you talk back. This is the premise of “Blackboard/Whiteboard”: to reference Toni Morrison’s “unspeakable things spoken”, to reference Gabrielle Civil’s translation of the body “into words on the page that
were written to be unheard”.
Let me break it down. I am creating a rebellion against structure as well as a celebration of difference in America.

“Blackboard/Whiteboard” is an attempt to complicate, intensely, our
relations to one another, but also to inspire us to be better.

About the ARTIST
Robert Eric Shoemaker (Writer & Performer) is a poet-playwright, theatre artist, and arts journalist. Eric is an MFA Candidate in Naropa University’s Creative Writing & Poetics program at the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. Eric’s poetry and plays have been featured in “Mosaic”, “Tooth N’ Nail”, “Rollick”, “Literature
Emitting Diodes”, “Chicago After Dark”, “Thought Notebook”, “Baseball Bard”, 2017’s “Verde Que Te Quiero Verde”, and his debut collection “30 Days Dry” from Thought Collection Publishing. Eric’s second book of poetry is forthcoming from In Extenso Press, with a third on the way through Partial Press, both expected in 2017.
Follow his work at reshoemaker.com.
Robert Eric Shoemaker, Artistic Director
Poetry Is Productions
robertericshoemaker@gmail.com
270.577.7782

MORE ABOUT POETRY IS & BEATS
Poetry Is Productions brings poetry into all that we do, be it theatre, film, dance,
publishing, or a new style of project.
UPCOMING EVENTS:
“medea conjures dragons” workshop and showcase at Boulder Writers Warehouse,
March 25
“(Un)Bound Book Arts Workshop” April 23-May 7 at the Boulder Public Library
“medea conjures dragons” production in Fall 2017
Poetry Is Productions – Poetry Is (For You. For Me. For All.)
https://poetryis.org/
https://www.facebook.com/poetryis.productions/
Beats: A Naropan Periodical – Writing from a Place of Urgency
https://aplaceofurgency.com/
https://www.facebook.com/aplaceofurgency/


For additional information, please contact Robert Eric Shoemaker at 270.577.7782,
robertericshoemaker@gmail.com.

http://reshoemaker.com

Jack Kerouac School @ AWP

 

Photos by Anisah Ali, Garen Lavender, Swanee, Erika Hodges

My mother bites her nails, and I am not like her. I am the skin around her. —  How Ginsberg can I bed? — I am here and you are here but we are nowhere to be found. — Looked at the map unfolded on his lap. “Empire of ideas.” — I want to tell you I am coming. Please don’t Super Nova yet. — If learn is synonymous with teach, how is student not synonymous with teacher? — Remember who owned the land we now occupy.

These are all lines from the Student & Alumni reading on Saturday afternoon. Their voices on the foreground to the exhibit hall hum, the culmination of four days worth of book mongering, poetry-promoting, free-speech protesting, heritage, vigil and vigor. 

It was an inspiring long weekend, which began with our first visitor to our table of the weekend, Alice Notley, garbed in a white scarf with sky-blue owls on it. Between her and other old friends to bright, new faces inquiring to our graduate programs we had such visitors as to make us full on Community. And what we brought to give away, we gave it all– issues 41 & 42 of Bombay Gin, select broadsides and anthologies, ex libris stickers, and other sweet swag. 

And although everything happened at once, and we were sad not to see you all, Summer Writing Program is right around the corner to reunite our tribe of Bodhisattvas. 

4×4 Reading Series

No. 1, a review by Sarah Escue

The 4×4 reading series creates a space in which writers from various Colorado communities can join together and share their creative works. The first 4×4 reading was held in the Nalanda Events Center at Naropa University on November 29, 2016. The readers included Megan “Babs” Heise (Naropa), Meghan Pipe (Fort Collins), Natalie Rogers (CU Denver), and Kailey-Alyssa Tucker (CU Boulder).

The readers wrote and spoke of ghosts, pickled brine, crustaceans, Batman villains, a boy named Steve, NPR broadcasts, organs, black holes, mental illness, a/sexuality, starfish, insomnia, repression, expression, and memory. Each reader made the audience laugh, hum, and ponder. The barrier between artist and audience crumbled, the room was anything but stagnant. Everyone was silent, reverent, open, alive.

Megan Heise from Naropa says, “I think the 4×4 is an amazing opportunity to share one’s work and connect with the larger Front Range literary community, and I’m honored to have represented Naropa at the first reading of the 2016-2017 series. I’m eager to support my classmates reading in the next three, and to learn about the creative work of writers from the other schools represented.”

The 4×4 series is a  way to connect with the Colorado literary and art community. Upcoming 4×4 readings will be posted on the Jack Kerouac Schedule of Events.

 

Sarah Escue is earning her MFA in Creative Writing & Poetics in the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics.

Writers in Community Speakeasy

Dec. 6, 2016

The Writers in Community Speakeasy is a reading in which undergraduate and graduate writing students who are taking the course Writers in Community have the opportunity to come together and share the creative work they produced during the semester.

image7

Travis Newbill, MFA

Writer’s in Community is a course that engages several aspects of being a writer, from the page to performance, from innovative poetic concerns to professional development. Several working writers, such as Gabrielle Civil, Eugene Lim, and Muriel Leung, are invited to give in-class lectures and/or lead workshops. During this course, students also have the opportunity to explore contemplative gestures and writing processes, such as meditation, free movement, and more. By the course’s end, students have completed a context presentation, a prospectus proposing a project of their own, a creative portfolio based on the course’s focus of study, and a short professional dossier with career goals.

image8

Steve San Luis, BA

The WIC Speakeasy was held in the Nalanda Atrium on December 6, 2016. Students read poems and prose, and some even performed spoken word poetry. The readers and performers included: Ben Gross, Emily Duffy, Camille Craig, Eric Shoemaker, Chance Boatman, Jessica Down, Danielle Gardner, Joshua Musicant, Erika Hodges, Kaleb Worst, Holly Salvatore, Jack Eley, Kristiane Weeks, Julien Blundell, Paul Gomez, Kate Langyher, Ryan Mihaly, Lea Pendersen, Sarah Escue, Michele Lorusso Ortega, Shelly Robinson, Paige Frisone, Travis Newbill, Steve San Luis, and Grace Horton.

The Speakeasy was an energized space in which undergraduate and graduate writers could share their work, support each other, and chat over tacos post-reading. It was such an honor to read alongside so many talented and encouraging people. And it was an even bigger honor to hear their stories, poems, and songs.

Review & photos by:                                                                                     Sarah Escue is earning her MFA in Creative Writing & Poetics in the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics.

Issue 3 of Something on Paper

In celebration of National Poetry Month, the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics presents Something on Paper, an online literary / multimedia poetics journal.

The third issue has dropped and features lectures by Lisa Jarnot and Dorothy Wang; interviews with Kevin Killian and Laura McCullough; a round table discussion on Sewing is Writing is Body is Sewing with Elena Berriolo, Jan Johnson, Jill Magi, and Rachel May; investigations by Teresa Carmody, Jill Darling, Richard Froude, Miranda Mellis, Jai Arun Ravine, Andrea Rexilius, and Matt Wedlock; as well as cover art by Liz Acosta. And so much more!

Please visit the site today! www.somethingonpaper.org

The Sage by Liz Acosta
Much appreciation to our editorial board and the innumerable JKS / Naropa students, faculty, staff, and alumni, who contributed reviews, articles, interviews, transcriptions, tech support, event support, website design, video recording and closed captioning, etc.

Thank you for supporting the journal!